Hawaiian Word for Today: Iki

7 10 2015


Iki- small or little

Keep the Hawaiian Language alive by teaching some one you love this word. Stop today to talk to a child about the beauty of the Hawaiian language.

Hula as History

20 09 2015

The easiest way to memorize our history is by doing it through the hula. Hula keeps our history alive, and without it one cannot truly identify oneself as being Hawaiian. -Al Makahinu Barcarse

Birds of Hawaii: Ae’o

10 09 2015
Himantopus mexicanus knudseni

Himantopus mexicanus knudseni

Also knows as the Hawaiian Stilt, the Ae’o is a tall slender wading bird with pink legs and a long thin black bill. It is 16″ and its voice is a loud, sharp “keek” call given in flight and when disturbed on the ground. Also gives a soft more muted call while resting. They exhibit a strong flapping flight with its legs trailing behind. Often found in mudflats, marshy areas, and ponds. They feed on fish, crabs, aquatic insects, and worms.

Learning New Hawaiian Words: Hopenapule

7 09 2015


Hopenapule– the weekend


Keep the Hawaiian Language alive by teaching some one you love this word. Stop today to talk to a child about the beauty of the Hawaiian language.

Portuguese Sweet Bread

3 09 2015

If you are lucky enough to be passing by the Old Greenwell Farm on a Thursday between 10-1 stop by to see the Kona Historical Society “Living History” demonstration. Go down in the field where you will see their wood-fired forno, an outdoor stone oven, they built in 2005 to bake Portuguese Bread the old-fashioned way.

Greenwell Farm\’s Living History Display

The Portuguese from the Azores and Madeira started coming to Kona in the 1870s to work in the ranching industry in Hawaii. Where they settled they would build these stone ovens and bake their breads, soon they began baking and selling the breads to supplement their income.

Portuguese Sweet Bread hot from the wood fired oven Thursdays 10-1

It’s a great thing to see this artful process and witness the excitement on the faces of those waiting for the freshly baked warm bread straight from the outdoor oven. A splendid delight with a pat of butter a tasty part of Hawaiian History.

The Kona Historical Society offices, H.N. Greenwell Store, and the Portuguese stone oven are all located on Mamalahoa Highway (Highway 11), about 14 miles south of the town of Kailua-Kona, between mile markers 111 and 112. Look for our sign on the makai (toward the ocean) side of the road. GPS: N19° 30.647 W 155° 55.225

More Hawaiian Wisdom

25 08 2015

Taro leaf and a very happy man living Aloha!

This is roughly translated to mean:

“The goodness of the taro is judged by the young plant it produces.”

This wise phase is said to be a commentary of the behavior of children being a reflection of their parents.

Ke Kanawai Mamalahoe – Law of the Splintered Paddle

22 08 2015


E hele ka `elemakule, ka luahine,
a me na kamali`i a moe i ke ala
`a`ohe mea nana e ho`opilikia.

Let the old men, the old women, and the children go
and sleep on the wayside; let them not be molested.

The Law of the Splintered Paddle,
King Kamehameha I.

The law of the splintered paddle declared that old men and women and children may lie on the roadside and they shall not be molested. A royal edict of Kamehameha the Great, thus began the era of freedom from violent assault.

In ancient Hawai‘i, there were no laws as we know them today. The sacred kapu, traditions, respect for one another and love for the land kept order and harmony among men and women long before the haole (foreigners) arrived, bringing their varieties of civilization. It was only with the changing times and contact with Europeans that laws came to be written down. As a tribute to his people, the very first law proclaimed by Kamehameha the Great was a law that protected them all, from the elderly to the very young.

Mamala means “splintered”; hoe means “paddle.” Kanawai refers to water and the responsibility the Hawaiians had of controlling and conserving their streams. It was the closest word they had to “law.”

There are many stories of how this law came about. One tells of a commoner who taught Kamehameha that human life — any human life — was precious and deserved respect, and that it was wrong for the powerful to mistreat those who may be weaker.

The teacher was a fisherman. The student was Kamehameha as a warrior before he united the islands. The lesson was not written in a book or on a chalkboard. It was delivered with the whack of a wooden canoe paddle. It was a harsh lesson, but Kamehameha never forgot it, because he later turned that lesson into Hawai‘i’s first official written law.

Used with permission from “The Law of the Splintered Paddle,” Copyright 1994 Hawaii Legal Auxiliary


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