A Stranger…. Only for a Day

22 03 2015

Ho`okaāhi no laā o ka malihini 

in the spirit of cooperation and working together, this saying is to encourage a guest after a day to help out with the work with the rest.





Ka Lae, The Point

17 03 2015

Ka Lae is accessible via South Point Road, a 12 mile paved narrow road leading from State Route 11 (Hawai’i Belt Road), the turn off being about 7 miles west of the village of ʻālehu and east of Ocean View, Hawaii This is said to be the first place the Ancients arrived in Hawai’i.

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If you look carefully along the shore you can see holes in some of the lava rocks that were used for mooring, carved holes from ancient times. Kai Lae, means “the point” and there is a fishing shrine there known Kalalea Heiau or Hale o Kalalea. Because there was so much comings and goings offerings were left in this area as thanks for the safe ocean journeys. Women were not allowed (kapu).

You can still see this small 43x 35 foot heiau according to the terrific book Ancient Sites of Hawaii by Van James: “On the main platforms in a pōhaku called Kūmaiea (female), but also attributed to Kāne and on the smaller platform just mauku is another upright store called Kanemakua (male), associated with the god Kanaloa. Standing twelve feet to the north of the heiau are two more stones, the northerly one called “Ai’ai, the son of Kū’ula. Within the heiau, beside the mauka wall, is a rock called Kū’ula, the god of fishermen. Hina, the wife of Kū’ula is said to live in the sea cave just offshore from the Kalalea Heaiau.”

hina-the-hawaiian-moon-goddess

Please buy this fine book from you local bookseller in its revised edition for additional information about visiting this magical place. Swimming in this area is not recommended because of the intense current it is called the “Halaea Current” named after the chief who was carried off to his death. Beware!





Kahu: Learning Hawaiian Words

10 03 2015

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Kahu, a guardian or keeper

Kahu ma’i, a nurse

Keep the Hawaiian Language alive by teaching some one you love this word. Stop today to talk to a child about the beauty of the Hawaiian language.





Jack London: on Aloha

5 03 2015

 

In what other land save this one is the commonest form of greeting not “Good day,” nor “How d’ye do”, but “Love”? That greeting is ‘Aloha': love, I love you, my love to you… It is a positive affirmation of the warmth of one’s own heart-giving. – Jack London





Marquesans: Why Did They Come to Hawaii?

20 02 2015

Hawaiian Islands

There are many different theories about why the people of the Marquesas Island people came to Hawaii.  Some believe that it is war, a severe climate or lack of resources forced them to leave their home land. Other believe that they arrived in search of better fishing grounds as they tended to fish way out at sea. It is thought that the first group of Marquesans arrived  in Hawaiian Islands about A.D. 447 settling in Waimanalo, O’hau at Bellows Beach on the windward side of the island.





Pele Hawaiian Goddess of the Volcano

1 02 2015

Pele by Herb Kawainui Kane

Hawaiian legends tell that eruptions are caused by Pele, the beautiful Goddess of Volcanoes during moments of anger. Pele is both revered and feared; her immense power and many adventures figure prominently in ancient Hawaiian songs and chants.

PELE – the Hawaiian (Polynesian) goddess of Fire and volcano, was born in Honua-Mea, part of Tahiti.

She was one of a family of six daughters and seven sons born to Haumea (a very ancient Earth goddess) and Kane Milohai (creator of the sky, earth and upper heavens). She was exiled by her father because of her temper, and for fighting with her elder water-goddess sister Na-maka-o-Kaha’i, whose husband Pele had seduced.

Pele’s oldest brother, Kamohoali’i, the king of the sharks, gave her a great canoe, in which she carried her little sister, Hi’iaka (or Hi’iaka i ka poli o Pele) who is known as the patroness of hula dancers, in egg-form, over the seas eventually finding Hawaii.

When Pele got to Hawaii, she first used her Pa’oa, or o’o stick on Kauai — striking deep into the earth but she was attacked by her older sister and left for dead. Pele recovered and fled to Oahu, where she dug several “fire pits,” including the crater we now called Diamond Head, in Honolulu. After that, Pele left her mark on the island of Molokai before traveling further southeast to Maui and creating the Haleakala Volcano. Namakaokahai, Pele’s older sister, realized she was still alive and she went to Maui to do battle. Finally, the epic battle ended near Hana, Maui, where Pele was torn apart by her sister.

Legend has it that her bones remain as a hill called Ka-iwi-o-Pele. Upon death, she became a god and is said to have found a home on Mauna Kea, on the Big Island of Hawai’i. Pele dug her final and eternal fire pit, Halemaumau Crater, at the summit of Kilauea Volcano.

She is said to live there to this day and is thought to be happy there because it was the Navel of the World, Ka Piko o ka Honua — were the gods began creation. She causes earthquakes by stamping her feet and volcanic eruptions of fiery devastation by digging with the Pa’oe, her magic stick.

Sightings of Pele have been reported all over the islands of Hawaii for hundreds of years, but especially near craters and her home, Mount Kilauea, one of the most active volcanoes on Earth. Pele is known for her violent temper, but also for her common visits among mortals. She is said to appear either as a tall, beautiful young woman or as a very old, ugly and frail woman.





Queen Lydia Liliuokalani

28 01 2015

`Onipa`a.

Stand firm.

Motto of Queen Lili`uokalani.

(September 2, 1838 – November 11, 1917)

Queen Liliuokalani was the last reigning monarch of the Hawaiian Islands.

She was born in Honolulu to high chief Kapaakea and the chiefess Keohokalole, the third of ten children. Liliuokalani was adopted at birth by Abner Paki and his wife Konia. At age 4, her adoptive parents enrolled her in the Royal School. There she became fluent in English and was influenced by Congregational missionaries. She also became part of the royal circle attending Kamehameha IV and Queen Emma.

Liliuokalani married a ha’ole, John Owen Dominis on September 16, 1862. Dominis served the monarchy as the Governor of O’ahu and Maui.

Upon the death of her brother, King Kalakauam Liliuokalani ascended the throne of Hawaii in January 1891.

One of her first acts was to recommend a new Hawaii constitution, as the “Bayonet Constitution” of 1887 limited the power of the monarch and political power of native Hawaiians. In 1893, Queen Liliuokalani sought to empower herself and Hawaiians through a new constitution. A group led by Sanford B. Dole sought to overthrow the institution of the monarchy. The American minister in Hawaii, John L. Stevens, called for troops to take control of Iolani Palace and various other governmental buildings. In 1894, the Queen, was deposed, the monarchy abrogated, and a provisional government was established which later became the Republic of Hawaii.








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