More Hawaiian Wisdom

25 08 2012

Taro plant

I MAIKA’I KE KALO I KA ‘OHĀ

This is roughly translated to mean:

“The goodness of the taro is judged by the young plant it produces.”

This wise phase is said to be a commentary of the behavior of children being a reflection of their parents.





Saying about Parents in Hawaiian

25 07 2012

O KA MAKUA KE KE KO’O O KA HALE E PA’ A AI

roughly translated means:

“The parent is the support that holds the household together.”





Wisdom of the ages in Hawaiian

25 06 2012

NASA's view of Mauna Loa Volcano

I KA MOA I HĀNAI IĀ I KA LĀ
I ‘IO AKU MAMUA O KA MOA I HANA I IĀ I KA MALU

roughly translated means:
“A rooster fed in the sun is stronger than one fed in the shade”





June 11th: King Kamehameha Day

11 06 2012

statue of King Kemehameha


June 11th is King Kamehameha Day, and is celebrated the second weekend of June with parades and remembrances of this glorious king. It is King Kamehameha (ca. 1758 – May 8, 1819), also known as Kamehameha the Great, who conquered the Hawaiian Islands and formally established the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi in 1810.

North Kohala King Kamehameha Day


As king, Kamehameha took several steps to ensure that the islands remained a united realm even after his death. He unified the legal system and he used the products he collected in taxes to promote trade with Europe and the United States. Kamehameha did not allow non-Hawaiians to own land; they would not be able to until the Great Mahele of 1848. This edict ensured the islands’ independence even while many of the other islands of the Pacific succumbed to the colonial powers.





Hawaiian Sayings

25 05 2012

NO KEKAHI O KĀKOU KA PILIKIA MALAILA PU KĀKOU A PAU

roughly translated means:
“Should one of us get in trouble we will all go that way”





2010 Hawaiian Rain Forest Postage Stamps

10 05 2012

2010 Hawaiian Rain Forest Stamps

These handsome stamps feature a Hawaiian rain forest painted by John D. Dawson to remind us all of the important of preserving this habitat for the plants and animals that need shelter from civilization.

from the US Postal Service site:
Featuring a Hawaiian rain forest, the 2010 Nature of America issuance is the 12th stamp pane in an educational series focusing on the beauty and complexity of major plant and animal communities in the United States.

The setting for the colorful acrylic painting on the stamp pane is a rain forest on Hawaiʻi’s largest island, which is also named Hawaiʻi. Artist John D. Dawson painted the scene and each of the previous ones in the Nature of America series.

To illustrate the spectacular biodiversity of a Hawaiian rain forest, the artist depicted more than 24 different species. The scene itself is completely imaginary. Such a dense grouping was necessary in order to show as many plants and animals as possible in the stamp pane format. Even so, every species depicted could be encountered in a Hawaiian rain forest, and all of the species and their interactions are appropriate and were recommended by scientists.

A description of the rain forest and a numbered key to the artwork appear on the back of the stamp pane, along with a corresponding list of common and scientific names for 24 selected species.





May First: May Day is Lei Day

1 05 2012

In 1928 poet Don Blanding, sometimes referred to as the poet laureate of Hawaii, wrote an article in the Honolulu newspaper suggesting that a day be set aside to create leis, to keep this important tradition alive in the hearts of all Hawaiians. It was made an official territory holiday just a year later. It remains today an important day of celebration with parades and people wearing their hand crafted leis.

When Don Blanding died. in 1957, his ashes were scattered from lei adorned canoes off the beach in Waikiki a fitting farewell to a man who carried Hawaii in his heart.









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