Fish of Hawaii: Lagoon Triggerfish

15 05 2015


This commonly seen fish prefers calm waters and lives in shallow areas and sandy spots. It is sometimes called a Picasso Triggerfish because of the yellow line that extends from it’s mouth giving it the look of an abstract piece of artwork. Perhaps more abstract to most and more challenging to spell than Mississippi is the Hawaiian name for this fish: humu­humu­nuku­nuku­āpua`a

Learning to spell the name of this fish will certainly win the hearts of islanders and before you get any bright ideas it is too many letters for Scrabble.





Linohau: The Hawaiian Language

10 05 2015
photo by Anne Cole, Kailua Kona, HI

photo by Anne Cole, Kailua Kona, HI

Linohau is Hawaiian meaning dressed to perfection, beautifully decorated.

These women riding on horseback in the parade are linohau.

 

Keep the Hawaiian Language alive by teaching some one you love this word. Stop today to talk to a child about the beauty of the Hawaiian language.





May First: May Day is Lei Day

1 05 2015

In 1928 poet Don Blanding, sometimes referred to as the poet laureate of Hawaii, wrote an article in the Honolulu newspaper suggesting that a day be set aside to create leis, to keep this important tradition alive in the hearts of all Hawaiians. It was made an official territory holiday just a year later. It remains today an important day of celebration with parades and people wearing their hand crafted leis.

When Don Blanding died. in 1957, his ashes were scattered from lei adorned canoes off the beach in Waikiki a fitting farewell to a man who carried Hawaii in his heart.






A Flower Lei and a Kiss…

18 04 2015

Aloha Spirit

The tradition of giving a kiss when presenting a lei was said to have begun by a USO dancer in World War II. She was dared by her peers to kiss an attractive Navy man and when she did she gave him her flower necklace and told him it was a Hawaiian tradition and made it so from that point forward. Hard to know if this is the true beginnings of this tradition but it certainly makes a great story!





Keeping the Hawaiian Language Alive: Manu

10 04 2015

Gray Fracolin introduced to Hawaii in the 1950s from India

Manu,  a bird

Manu Aloha, Parrot

Keep the Hawaiian Language alive by teaching some one you love this word. Stop today to talk to a child about the beauty of the Hawaiian language.





Hawaiian Quilts: An Ongoing Tradition

7 04 2015

 

million little stitches





A Stranger…. Only for a Day

22 03 2015

Ho`okaāhi no laā o ka malihini 

in the spirit of cooperation and working together, this saying is to encourage a guest after a day to help out with the work with the rest.








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