Keeping the Hawaiian Language Alive: Manu

10 04 2015

Gray Fracolin introduced to Hawaii in the 1950s from India

Manu,  a bird

Manu Aloha, Parrot

Keep the Hawaiian Language alive by teaching some one you love this word. Stop today to talk to a child about the beauty of the Hawaiian language.





A Stranger…. Only for a Day

22 03 2015

Ho`okaāhi no laā o ka malihini 

in the spirit of cooperation and working together, this saying is to encourage a guest after a day to help out with the work with the rest.





Kahu: Learning Hawaiian Words

10 03 2015

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Kahu, a guardian or keeper

Kahu ma’i, a nurse

Keep the Hawaiian Language alive by teaching some one you love this word. Stop today to talk to a child about the beauty of the Hawaiian language.





Jack London: on Aloha

5 03 2015

 

In what other land save this one is the commonest form of greeting not “Good day,” nor “How d’ye do”, but “Love”? That greeting is ‘Aloha’: love, I love you, my love to you… It is a positive affirmation of the warmth of one’s own heart-giving. – Jack London





Saying about Parents in Hawaiian

25 07 2014

O KA MAKUA KE KE KO’O O KA HALE E PA’ A AI

roughly translated means:

“The parent is the support that holds the household together.”





Wisdom of the Ages in Hawaiian

25 06 2013

NASA’s view of Mauna Loa Volcano

I KA MOA I HĀNAI IĀ I KA LĀ
I ‘IO AKU MAMUA O KA MOA I HANA I IĀ I KA MALU

roughly translated means:
“A rooster fed in the sun is stronger than one fed in the shade”





Hawaiian Sayings

25 05 2013

 

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NO KEKAHI O KĀKOU KA PILIKIA MALAILA PU KĀKOU A PAU

roughly translated means:
“Should one of us get in trouble we will all go that way”





Some Hawaiian Parenting Advice

25 04 2013

 

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KA HANA A KA MĀ, O KA HANA NO IA A KEIKI

roughly translated means:

“What parents do, children will do”





Another Hawaiian Saying

25 03 2012

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HO’OKĀHI NO HULU LIKE O IA PO’E

roughly translated means:

“These people are all of the same feather”





Quotations in Hawaiian: King Liholiho’s words

25 02 2012

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NA WAI HO’I KA ‘OLE O KE AKAMAI,
HE ALANUI MA’A I KA HELE ‘IA E O’U MAU MĀKUA?

This is what King Liloliho said when someone applauded his wisdom.

It means roughly “Why shouldn’t I know, when it is a road often traveled by my parents?”





Hawaiian Kindness

8 01 2012

E`ōpū ali`i

This is a little reminder that means it is important to remember to “Have the heart of a chief.” Be kind, generous, and even tempered like a chief.

Perhaps this is the ancient way of saying: Live Aloha.





Man & the Land : Who Serves Who

8 12 2011

He ali`ka `āina; he kauwā ke kanaka

The land is a chief; man is its servant.

This means that the land has little use for man, but man needs the land for sustenance and livelihood. This is an important reminder for modern man to remember just who is in charge–Nature.





Another Hawaiian Proverb

8 11 2011

Aloha kekahi i kekahi 

This is the Hawaiian way of saying “love one another”

Isn’t this an important message to carry in your heart every day to promote aloha?





Hawaiian Proverb: Work Together

8 10 2011


Ho ̀okaāhi ka ̀`ilāu like ana  

is a Hawaiian saying that means: Wield the paddles together.

This is a proverb that encourages cooperation and working together in harmony as ancient paddlers have done for hundreds of years.





Hawaiian Proverbs: `Ōlelo No`eau

8 09 2011

 

‘A`ohe hua o ka mai`a i ka lā ho’okaāhi  

means when a task is done together no task is too big…

this is another way of saying many hands make light work, an important lesson to remember.





Aloha Greetings: Learning More about the Hawaiian Language

10 08 2011

Learning a few different Aloha greeting enhances your knowledge of the Hawaiian language and keeps the language alive each time it is used. Won’t you spend a few minutes today to try these greetings and share them with friend and family?

Aloha Kakahiaka Good morning
Aloha Awakea Good Day
Aloha Ahiaha Good Evening
Aloha a Hui Hou Goodbye Until we Meet Again





Precious Fresh Water and Kalo

17 07 2011

Taro or Kalo as it is known in Hawaiian was the most important food plant in ancient Hawaii. To properly irrigate the Kalo the cultivators known as kanaka mahi’ai had to design a series of ‘auwai or irrigation ditches to insure that their crops would have ample fresh water from the upland areas. Kalo was known as the “plant of the land” and was best grown near cool flowing waters.





Many Hands Make Light Work

10 07 2011


Learning Hawaiian words keeps the language alive, take a moment today to learn a new Hawaiian word or expression and share it with a child. This is a fun family activity and will keep the language in motion and alive.

Laulima means “many hands” and is an expression in Hawaiian that was known to mean to collaborate or work together cooperatively. Laulima made daily tasks more enjoyable and easier than to do them alone with a struggle. Children often helped with the family tasks and people worked together to fish, cultivate, and build. White people use the expression “Many hands make light work” but the Hawaiian word for this is laulima.





The Monarchs of Hawaii: After the Kamehamehas

20 06 2011

King Lunalilo

William C. Lunalilo lived from 1835-1874 and ruled from 1873-1874
born William Charles Lunalilo, he was the shortest serving monarch

King Kalakaua

David Kalakaua lived from 1836-1891 and ruled from 1874-1891
born David Laʻamea Kamanakapuʻu Mahinulani Nalaiaehuokalani Lumialani Kalākaua

Queen Liliuokalani

Lydia Lili’uokalani lived from 1838-1917 and ruled from 1838-1917
born Lydia Kamakaʻeha Kaola Maliʻi Liliʻuokalani She was also known as Lydia Kamakaʻeha Pākī, with the chosen royal name of Liliʻuokalani

Lili’uokalani was deposed and the Hawaiian Kingdome came to an end on January 17, 1893

The Queen’s Royal Monogram





Learning Hawaiian Words: Ke kanaka lawai’a

10 06 2011

Kona storm

It’s always fun to learn new Hawaiian words and it is important to keep the language alive and remembered:

Ke kanaka lawai’a this means “the person who fishes.” This was one of the major pastimes of early Hawaiians who depended on the oceans for their protein. Fishing was and is still an important part of Hawaiian culture.