Hawaiian Word of the Day: Noke

7 07 2015

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Noke– to preserve and move forward

Keep the Hawaiian Language alive by teaching some one you love this word. Stop today to talk to a child about the beauty of the Hawaiian language.





O Hawaii no ka aina maikai

2 07 2015

After all, Hawaii is the best land. (O Hawaii no ka aina maikai)

~ Hawaiian Proverb





Hawaiian Words to Learn

24 06 2015

Hawaiian Words to Know:

Here’s a handy list of simple Hawaiian words you may encounter and should learn:

‘A ina – (eye-nah) – Land.
Ali’i – (ah-LEE-ee) – A Hawaiian chief; a member of the chiefly class.
Aloha – (ah-LOW-ha) – Hello, goodbye, or a feeling or the spirit of love, affection, or kindness.
Hale – (hah-leh) – House or building.
Hana – (ha-nah) – Work.
Hana hou – (ha-nah-HO) – To do again.
Haole – (how-leh) – foreigner; Caucasion.
He`iau – (hey-ee-ow) – Hawaiian temple.
Hula – (hoo-lah) – The story-telling dance of Hawai`i.
Imu – (ee-moo) – An underground oven.
Kahuna – (kah-HOO-na) – A priest or minister; someone who is an expert in a profession.
Kai – (kigh) – The sea.
Kalua – (KAH-loo-ah) – Cooking food underground.
Kama`aina – (kah-ma-EYE-nah) – Long-time Hawaiian resident.
Kane – (kah-neh) – Boy or man.
Kapu – (kah-poo) – Forbidden, taboo; keep out.
Keiki – (kay-key) – Child or children.
Kokua – (koh-koo-ah) – Help.
Kona – (koh-NAH) – Leeward side of the island; wind blowing from the south, southwest direction.
Lanai – (lah-NIGH) – Porch, veranda, patio.
Lei – (lay) – Necklace of flowers, shells, or feathers.
Limu – (lee-moo) – Edible seaweed
Lomi – (loh-mee) – To rub or massage; lomi salmon is raw salmon rubbed with salt.
Lu`au – (loo-ow) – Hawaiian feast; literally means taro leaves.
Mahalo – (mah-hah-low) – Thank you.
Makai – (mah-kigh) – Toward the sea.
Malihini – (mah-lee-hee-nee) – A newcomer, visitor, or guest.
Mauka – (mow-kah) – Toward the mountain.
‘Ohana – (oh-hah-na) – Family.
‘Ono – (oh-no) – Delicious, the best tasting.
Pali – (pah-lee) – A cliff.
Paniolo – (pah-nee-oh-low) – Hawaiian cowboy.
Pau – (pow) – Finish, end, etc., Pau hana means quitting time from work.
Poi – (poy) – Pounded kalo (taro) root that forms a starchy paste.
Pono – (poh-no) – Goodness, excellence, correct, proper.
Pua – (poo-ah) – Flower, blossom.
Pupu – (poo-poo) – Appetizer, snacks, or finger foods.
Wahine – (wah-hee-nay) – Woman.
Wai – (why) – Fresh water.
Wikiwiki – ( wee-kee-wee-kee) – To hurry up, very quick.

Simple Secrets and Tips:

  1. The Hawaiian alphabet has only 12 letters – the five regular vowels (a, e, i, o, and u) and seven consonants (h, k, l, m, n, p, w).
  2. The vowels are pronounced ah, ey, ee, oh and oo, not ay, ee, eye, oh and you like in English.
  3. Most of the time each vowel in a word is pronounced separately.
  4. Remember that all letters are pronounced.

 

There are a couple of simple tricks to help you pronounce them properly:

 

  • Hawaiian words may start with any letter, vowel or consonant.
  • Hawaiian words will never end with a consonant.
  • Syllables in Hawaiian words are only one or two letters, never longer.
  • Syllables must end with a vowel, or can be a single vowel, but can never be a single consonant.





Hawaiian Quilting: a Colorful Art Form

20 06 2015

Missionaries taught quilting to the women of Hawaii who transformed it into a uniquely Hawaiian art form. The mild weather allowed far more time for details appliqué and quilting. Since one was not dependent on the quilt for warmth quilting was seen more as a leisurely activity that can be a good thing because it takes many months of hand stitching to complete.

Quilt motifs are drawn from forms of favorite plants. Hawaiian quilts typically have a central appliquéd motif and the stitch pattern often echo that design. The pattern of quilting is often likened to the imprint left by a patterned beater on Hawaiian kapa.

 





June 11th: King Kamehameha Day

11 06 2015

statue of King Kemehameha

June 11th is King Kamehameha Day, and is celebrated the second weekend of June with parades and remembrances of this glorious king. It is King Kamehameha (ca. 1758 – May 8, 1819), also known as Kamehameha the Great, who conquered the Hawaiian Islands and formally established the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi in 1810.

North Kohala King Kamehameha Day

As king, Kamehameha took several steps to ensure that the islands remained a united realm even after his death. He unified the legal system and he used the products he collected in taxes to promote trade with Europe and the United States. Kamehameha did not allow non-Hawaiians to own land; they would not be able to until the Great Mahele of 1848. This edict ensured the islands’ independence even while many of the other islands of the Pacific succumbed to the colonial powers.





Learning Hawaiian Words: Kauka

10 06 2015

Kauka is the Hawaiian word for doctor.

When one has rock fever going to see the Kauka is likely less wise than a trip off island.

Keep the Hawaiian Language alive by teaching some one you love this word. Stop today to talk to a child about the beauty of the Hawaiian language.





Respecting Hawaii

2 06 2015

Many visitors that come to Hawaii love the weather, to bask in their holiday time, but forget to explore the richly lived past of the Ancient Hawaiians.

For a more rich experience while visiting the magical Big Island take a walk on the King’s Trail, check out the petroglyphs, visit a heiau, and imagine yourself on the island before all the shoreline development and increased population pressures of modern life today.
Puukohola Heiau National Historical Site
Painting by Herb Kawainui Kane

The massive ruins of Puukohola Heiau are an impressive sight. The founding of the Hawaiian kingdom can be directly associated with one structure in the Hawaiian Islands: Pu’ukohola Heiau.

The temple was constructed to incur the favor of the war god Kuka’ilimoku. Built between 1790-91 by Kamehameha I (also known as Kamehameha the Great), together with chiefs, commoners, men, women and children. As British sailor John Young looked on, the temple was built and dedicated, a chief rival was sacrificed, and the war god Ku was pleased. Kamehameha I waged several subsequent battles using Western military strategy and weapons to extend his control over all Hawaiian Islands. The monarchy he established lasted 83 years, from 1810-1893.

Visit the Lapakahi State Historical Park up the Kohala Coast and walk among the ancient site.

Lapakahi State Historical Park is the archaeological site of what remains of a traditional 14th century Hawaiian fishing community. Lapakahi is one of the best-preserved fishing village in Hawaii. A self-guided tour takes visitors to house sites and a canoe halau (long house); runs through a game area where visitors can try spear throwing, ‘ulu maika (disc rolling) and konane (checkers); and leads to a fishing shrine and salt pans along the rocky shoreline.

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Explore the early Hawaiian life of the common people through cultural demonstrations of daily activities, story telling, and self-guided one mile loop walk through the partially restored remains of this ancient Hawaiian coastal settlement. Wear decent shoes and go early if you want to beat the heat, it’s a dry part of the island. This 265-acre park is located along the shoreline of the Lapakahi Marine Life Conservation District. The nearby ocean waters comprise a marine preserve with various activities regulated but great snorkeling. Park gate is open from 7 a.m. to closes promptly at 4 p.m.

Take this the site to heart and you will be transported back to earlier times allowing you to reflect upon the Hawaiian first people.

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Hawaii is lovely place, respect the past by treating the island with a reverence for it heritage is a part of being a responsible visitor to the islands. Get out and walk and explore. Pick up any trash you find and remember to live the Aloha Spirit.





Imu: In-ground Cooking from Hawaii

30 05 2015

Imu

Throughout Polynesia, Melanesia, and Micronesia, traditional underground ovens have been utilized to cook and steam food. The Hawaiians use an imu to steam whole pigs, breadfruit, bananas, sweet potatoes, taro, chicken, and fish. The imu is essentially an underground pressure cooker created by digging into the earth as compactly as possible with room for the rocks, leaves, fuel and food. Due to the amount of time and labor to prepare the imu this method of cooking is done primarily for large luaus.





Fish of Hawaii: Lagoon Triggerfish

15 05 2015


This commonly seen fish prefers calm waters and lives in shallow areas and sandy spots. It is sometimes called a Picasso Triggerfish because of the yellow line that extends from it’s mouth giving it the look of an abstract piece of artwork. Perhaps more abstract to most and more challenging to spell than Mississippi is the Hawaiian name for this fish: humu­humu­nuku­nuku­āpua`a

Learning to spell the name of this fish will certainly win the hearts of islanders and before you get any bright ideas it is too many letters for Scrabble.





Linohau: The Hawaiian Language

10 05 2015
photo by Anne Cole, Kailua Kona, HI

photo by Anne Cole, Kailua Kona, HI

Linohau is Hawaiian meaning dressed to perfection, beautifully decorated.

These women riding on horseback in the parade are linohau.

 

Keep the Hawaiian Language alive by teaching some one you love this word. Stop today to talk to a child about the beauty of the Hawaiian language.





May First: May Day is Lei Day

1 05 2015

In 1928 poet Don Blanding, sometimes referred to as the poet laureate of Hawaii, wrote an article in the Honolulu newspaper suggesting that a day be set aside to create leis, to keep this important tradition alive in the hearts of all Hawaiians. It was made an official territory holiday just a year later. It remains today an important day of celebration with parades and people wearing their hand crafted leis.

When Don Blanding died. in 1957, his ashes were scattered from lei adorned canoes off the beach in Waikiki a fitting farewell to a man who carried Hawaii in his heart.






A Flower Lei and a Kiss…

18 04 2015

Aloha Spirit

The tradition of giving a kiss when presenting a lei was said to have begun by a USO dancer in World War II. She was dared by her peers to kiss an attractive Navy man and when she did she gave him her flower necklace and told him it was a Hawaiian tradition and made it so from that point forward. Hard to know if this is the true beginnings of this tradition but it certainly makes a great story!





Keeping the Hawaiian Language Alive: Manu

10 04 2015

Gray Fracolin introduced to Hawaii in the 1950s from India

Manu,  a bird

Manu Aloha, Parrot

Keep the Hawaiian Language alive by teaching some one you love this word. Stop today to talk to a child about the beauty of the Hawaiian language.





Hawaiian Quilts: An Ongoing Tradition

7 04 2015

 

million little stitches





A Stranger…. Only for a Day

22 03 2015

Ho`okaāhi no laā o ka malihini 

in the spirit of cooperation and working together, this saying is to encourage a guest after a day to help out with the work with the rest.





Ka Lae, The Point

17 03 2015

Ka Lae is accessible via South Point Road, a 12 mile paved narrow road leading from State Route 11 (Hawai’i Belt Road), the turn off being about 7 miles west of the village of ʻālehu and east of Ocean View, Hawaii This is said to be the first place the Ancients arrived in Hawai’i.

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If you look carefully along the shore you can see holes in some of the lava rocks that were used for mooring, carved holes from ancient times. Kai Lae, means “the point” and there is a fishing shrine there known Kalalea Heiau or Hale o Kalalea. Because there was so much comings and goings offerings were left in this area as thanks for the safe ocean journeys. Women were not allowed (kapu).

You can still see this small 43x 35 foot heiau according to the terrific book Ancient Sites of Hawaii by Van James: “On the main platforms in a pōhaku called Kūmaiea (female), but also attributed to Kāne and on the smaller platform just mauku is another upright store called Kanemakua (male), associated with the god Kanaloa. Standing twelve feet to the north of the heiau are two more stones, the northerly one called “Ai’ai, the son of Kū’ula. Within the heiau, beside the mauka wall, is a rock called Kū’ula, the god of fishermen. Hina, the wife of Kū’ula is said to live in the sea cave just offshore from the Kalalea Heaiau.”

Please buy this fine book from you local bookseller in its revised edition for additional information about visiting this magical place. Swimming in this area is not recommended because of the intense current it is called the “Halaea Current” named after the chief who was carried off to his death. Beware!





Kahu: Learning Hawaiian Words

10 03 2015

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Kahu, a guardian or keeper

Kahu ma’i, a nurse

Keep the Hawaiian Language alive by teaching some one you love this word. Stop today to talk to a child about the beauty of the Hawaiian language.





Jack London: on Aloha

5 03 2015

 

In what other land save this one is the commonest form of greeting not “Good day,” nor “How d’ye do”, but “Love”? That greeting is ‘Aloha’: love, I love you, my love to you… It is a positive affirmation of the warmth of one’s own heart-giving. – Jack London





Marquesans: Why Did They Come to Hawaii?

20 02 2015

There are many different theories about why the people of the Marquesas Island people came to Hawaii.  Some believe that it is war, a severe climate or lack of resources forced them to leave their home land. Other believe that they arrived in search of better fishing grounds as they tended to fish way out at sea. It is thought that the first group of Marquesans arrived  in Hawaiian Islands about A.D. 447 settling in Waimanalo, O’hau at Bellows Beach on the windward side of the island.





Pele Hawaiian Goddess of the Volcano

1 02 2015

Pele by Herb Kawainui Kane

Hawaiian legends tell that eruptions are caused by Pele, the beautiful Goddess of Volcanoes during moments of anger. Pele is both revered and feared; her immense power and many adventures figure prominently in ancient Hawaiian songs and chants.

PELE – the Hawaiian (Polynesian) goddess of Fire and volcano, was born in Honua-Mea, part of Tahiti.

She was one of a family of six daughters and seven sons born to Haumea (a very ancient Earth goddess) and Kane Milohai (creator of the sky, earth and upper heavens). She was exiled by her father because of her temper, and for fighting with her elder water-goddess sister Na-maka-o-Kaha’i, whose husband Pele had seduced.

Pele’s oldest brother, Kamohoali’i, the king of the sharks, gave her a great canoe, in which she carried her little sister, Hi’iaka (or Hi’iaka i ka poli o Pele) who is known as the patroness of hula dancers, in egg-form, over the seas eventually finding Hawaii.

When Pele got to Hawaii, she first used her Pa’oa, or o’o stick on Kauai — striking deep into the earth but she was attacked by her older sister and left for dead. Pele recovered and fled to Oahu, where she dug several “fire pits,” including the crater we now called Diamond Head, in Honolulu. After that, Pele left her mark on the island of Molokai before traveling further southeast to Maui and creating the Haleakala Volcano. Namakaokahai, Pele’s older sister, realized she was still alive and she went to Maui to do battle. Finally, the epic battle ended near Hana, Maui, where Pele was torn apart by her sister.

Legend has it that her bones remain as a hill called Ka-iwi-o-Pele. Upon death, she became a god and is said to have found a home on Mauna Kea, on the Big Island of Hawai’i. Pele dug her final and eternal fire pit, Halemaumau Crater, at the summit of Kilauea Volcano.

She is said to live there to this day and is thought to be happy there because it was the Navel of the World, Ka Piko o ka Honua — were the gods began creation. She causes earthquakes by stamping her feet and volcanic eruptions of fiery devastation by digging with the Pa’oe, her magic stick.

Sightings of Pele have been reported all over the islands of Hawaii for hundreds of years, but especially near craters and her home, Mount Kilauea, one of the most active volcanoes on Earth. Pele is known for her violent temper, but also for her common visits among mortals. She is said to appear either as a tall, beautiful young woman or as a very old, ugly and frail woman.